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Deacon Digest for September: A Dandelion Theology

Recently I took this photo of an ordinary, yet extraordinary, dandelion. On the face of it, dandelions are common, unremarkable and relegated to the inauspicious category of weeds. And yet each little parachute of fluff is carefully and wonderfully made. What’s more, there are over 100 species of this weed throughout the world. When I zoomed in on the photo, it further revealed many different colors—pinks, blues, yellows—as well as patterns which revealed an undeniable creative “order.” There is so much more to the dandelion than meets the eye, and to me, it surely points to the mind of a master creator.

by Amanda Patrick on September 22, 2021

Recently I took this photo of an ordinary, yet extraordinary, dandelion. On the face of it, dandelions are common, unremarkable and relegated to the inauspicious category of weeds. And yet each little parachute of fluff is carefully and wonderfully made. What’s more, there are over 100 species of this weed throughout the world. When I zoomed in on the photo, it further revealed many different colors—pinks, blues, yellows—as well as patterns which revealed an undeniable creative “order.” There is so much more to the dandelion than meets the eye, and to me, it surely points to the mind of a master creator.

Pondering the wonders of this dandelion put me in mind of a familiar Bible verse: “So why do you worry about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin; and yet I say to you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. Now if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is, and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will He not much more clothe you…” (Matthew 6). 

When Jesus spoke to his followers, he often used illustrations from nature to help them understand what God is like—things that everyone could relate to, such as trees, sheep, rocks, stars, lilies and grass. If God can take care of billions of blades of grass and countless dandelions, which are here today and gone tomorrow, how much more will God take care of us?

There is a phrase, “the devil is in the details”…well, actually, God is in the details. What does it say about God that He creates such a common plant with such meticulous detail? And what does it say about how God regards us? May the wonders of creation move us to faith in the one who knows our needs even before we ask, and who loves us more than our hearts can imagine.  

Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about its own things. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.”  

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