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Steeple Newsletter

The Spiritual Practice of Sacred Spaces 

As long as there have been people, we have been declaring certain spaces as “thin spaces” …liminal and Sacred. This identifying of sacred spaces and totems is a large part of the work of the field of anthropology. We need Sacred Spaces to feel safe, to process big events, and to move forward. 

by The Rev. Jake Miles Joseph on July 08, 2020

Click here to read the full Steeple Newsletter for July 8, 2020. 

The Spiritual Practice of Sacred Spaces 
 
I miss my weekly un-office hours at Java Hut (formerly known as Perk) and the chance to see who shows up for prayer, conversation, pastoral care, ministry-brainstorming, or the excuse to have more coffee. That is a sacred responsibility as well! While I have missed the spiritual intimacy and the holy surprise of the face-to-face meetings on Wednesday afternoons, my office hours have continued by phone. On Wednesdays, from the safety of my office, I have been taking phone calls or writing notes to stay in touch with our members. Every week, I have different conversations that inspire me to go deeper in faith and ministry with First Church members and community. Ministry is always a conversation rather than a monologue between pastors and congregation—even (or especially) during these physically separated times. 


 
A couple of weeks ago, I had a call that changed how I understand what it means to create worship from a distance! Twila Skelly called simply to say hello and to share her worship experience with me. I asked for her permission to share this story. She is one of our members who chose to receive regular print worship by postal service mail including a copy of the worship bulletin and a manuscript of the sermon in lieu of the electronic email and video version. This is a loving ministry envisioned, enacted, and made possible by Penelope Rebuzzini. 
 
Twila told me how she has designated a sitting rock in Copper Hill Hollow, near her home, as her new sanctuary and place for worship—reading the sermon and singing the songs she knows from the service and feeling close with her church family. Sitting there with her worship materials, Twila shares our service with the natural wonders of her backyard. Twila has engaged the Spiritual Practice of Creating Sacred Space. I am sure that she is not alone in this. 
 
As long as there have been people, we have been declaring certain spaces as “thin spaces” …liminal and Sacred. This identifying of sacred spaces and totems is a large part of the work of the field of anthropology. We need Sacred Spaces to feel safe, to process big events, and to move forward. 
 
Where have you found Spiritual Sacred Space during this time when our meetinghouse has been closed? Is there a space that will remain sacred and connected for you moving forward from this time? 
 
We will return to the meetinghouse together someday. We can look forward to that with joy. In the meantime, I invite you to be inspired by Twila’s spiritual practice of space-making and find the sacred in new places as you worship with us by video-email or print every week. 
 
If you have a sacred space that you have connected to the practice of staying current with our worship, please email or call me at the office. I would love to hear your story! 
 
In Hope and Space-Making, 
Jake  
Minister of Faith Formation 

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